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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 100 to 118 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)
a 90-year-old san francisco institution that i'd like to commend today, and cynthia huey is here from the clement street merchants association, if she could come forward. i'm just very proud to work so closely with the clement street merchant association celebrating their 90th year this year. it's an organization that's been working hard to revitalize the richmond district, especially in the past few months as new leadership has emerged. the clement merchants association represents diverse businesses from a variety of cultural backgrounds that makes clement street stand out from other commercial districts. it's one of the most diverse places. i moved there in 1984 to second avenue and clement. it was considered the new chinatown but it's so much more than that. it's a gateway for many different types of newcomers but also businesses. this year, the clement street merchants celebrate their 90th year of outstanding service to the small business community to the whole city. and the roster is growing of many different businesses from cynthia huey's feed store, a great vintage clothing sto
appreciate the comments made by many in the audience of san francisco's uniqueness and our diverse culture but especially our respect for personal freedoms. i also have concerns similar to supervisor campos' that this may be an issue that's about one neighborhood, and mostly about one plaza, and i really don't think we need citywide legislation, especially overbroad legislation to deal with an isolated what i would call an isolated community incident. and i think this legislation also, as supervisor olague said, is not good use of our time and i will be voting no on it as well. >> president chiu: is there further discussion? supervisor wiener. >> supervisor wiener: thank you. thank you arbitration colleagues, for your comments. i just want to make a few points. first of all -- and some of the points i've heard today are some that some of the opposite have raised as well. to suggest this is not important enough or worthy of our time i did a little research and we could go back and i could probably find some resolutions and ordinances from pretty much every member of this body, that would --
in san francisco. it's a wonderful walking down, it has the potential of being really one of the great walking areas in the world. this enthusiasm has led me to notice there are issues with pedestrian safety and fortunately in this city where there are organizations covering just about everything that happens in the city, there are organizations associated with pedestrian safety, in particular in district 6 supervisor kim has an organization now run by sunny angelo on pedestrian safety and i have been attending those meetings and in fact have found them very interesting. when the mayor had the task force for pedestrian safety there was a subcommittee on data, the data subcommittee. i attended those meetings, they were very interesting. the question was, well, we have data, what do we do with the data, how do we relate data to the issues at hand. i found that to be very, very interesting. i have attended the psac meetings for a very long time as a member of the public. and i noticed that the one advantage i've seen with the psac, really a great advantage, is its continual organizat
think that we have a crisis in san francisco. happening in our public you know, we have one of the highest performing urban school districts in the country. we probably have the highest we probably have the highest performing urban schoolt and, yet, in such a high performing district, we still have a number of young people who are not doing well for whom the system is really failing. and i think that it's unacceptable to have the level of achievement gap that we have in san francisco. and even though money and resources is not the be-all, end-all it is part of the equation, it is part of the answer. it reality is -- and i say this as someone who worked at the school district for many years -- that there is only so much that the administration, that our teachers can do, that our parents can do, without those resources. and so that's why i think this is important, and this is important now. because i do think that we have a crisis. and the thing about the achievement gap and the low performance of some of these kids is that we also know that the™jpkñ gap becomes. and that,
please. >> good evening, supervisors. i'm elizabeth stampe, executive director of walk san francisco. and i'm here to encourage you to reject this appeal and affirm the planning department's decision to get these improvements happening as soon as possible on fell and oak, to calm traffic, and improve safety. these include 12 new bulbouts as you've heard, a shortened crossing district distance and increased visibility, and add new street greening. the traffic signals will be adjusted for lower speeds, safer speeds. these are important fixes to make some of the highest speed streets in our city closest to our most beloved park more safe for people walking. it clearly -- this project clearly falls into a categorical exemption from a full environmental review. it is clearly minor. and a reversal of the exemption would really set a bad precedent, forcing full reviews on traffic calming projects, even small scale fixes like bulbouts as well as other sustainable design improvements. a reversal would delay not only these current improvements that are much-needed as the previous speaker said
how to improve the bike network in san francisco and ever since we've been talking about how to increase pedestrian safety, oak street and fell street are three lanes in each direction, four lanes in some places, they carry 30,000-plus cars each day on each street. and people in this neighborhood and people who just move throughout the city have said that these streets don't feel safe, they don't feel comfortable, please do something about it. and it took a while and it took some momentum to get us going but we finally did it. we finally brought the community together and we worked over nine months with a variety of stakeholders, local stakeholders, people throughout the city. and we came up with a plan. and that plan went before the mta board. they considered the policy merits of it and decided to pass it unanimously on october 16. again, i just wanted to emphasize because i think it's so important that we were able to engage so many people throughout the community and to come up with a plan that was balanced. and we considered several options. we considered removing a lane
're seeing san francisco move in a direction that is working more for the wealthy when he clearly hits the notes i want to hear when he talks about making sure we have the perspective of folks that are not getting the advantage that many others are getting in the city. that's something we have to look for as a city and i want to appoint people to bodies that look at our land use from that perspective, so i would like to support mr. steen in this position and would like to motion that. >> okay, so there is a motion to move forward on mr. steen to the board for this seat on the market-octavia citizen's advicery committee. i just want to say a couple of things. i was one of the members had brought up concerns about insuring that we had a low income perspective in the market-octavia citizens advisory committee. i want to really appreciate mr. wolff for really spending the additional time to do some work and some research around some of the issues that impact our lower income communities and appreciate the time you spent with me to sit down and talk about some of these issues and i think
unacceptable to have the level of achievement gap that we have in san francisco. and even though money and resources is not the be-all, end-all it is part of the equation, it is part of the answer. it reality is -- and i say this as someone who worked at the school district for many years -- that there is only so much that the administration, that our teachers can do, that our parents can do, without those resources. and so that's why i think this is important, and this is important now. because i do think that we have a crisis. and the thing about the achievement gap and the low performance of some of these kids is that we also know that the™jpkñ gap becomes. and that, you know, to the extent that you wait six months, you wait a year, however the wait might be, that to have the impact then that you can have today, you probably will end up having to spend more money. and so that's why i believe that the sooner that we can act,ropíq better. so thank you again to everyone who's worked on this. >> president chiu: supervisor kim. >> supervisor kim: thank you. i just want to clari
spend more than we do on per people spending. in response to this in 2004 san francisco voters passed a measure to counter this. parents knew that although we were once first in the country in our public school system, not just k-12 but also higher education that we were neveris% going back there. so parents put on the ballot a measure called proposition h so we could ask the city to spend a morgs of our tax dollars to enrich our public schools. i know as a policy set asides are a controversial issue and agree they tie hands of legislators and city officials in how to prioritize budgetary dollars but we heard affirmative support from voters saying they of those dollars will go into our public schools, starting at 10 million and going up to 60 million. as a school board member i try to visit all of our schools and i visit schools almost once a week during the school year. and i can't tell you what an incredible impact proposition h has made in our schools. you actually see libraries in elementary schools, that hadn't been open in years, they didn't have librarians to put books in their
landscaping away and use natural native san francisco coastal plant to lament and create a place that we think is more inviting to use, more a traghtive and also, put interpretation again here about the site and possibly the silo art as well. >> thank you and can we go back to crank copark? >>> absolutely. >> love that one. that one. so i couldn't understand the differences between the initial phase alternate a and phase -- the difference --. >> so the initial so until the process of cost estimating the cost estimators estimatinged the total cost is twie million dollars but they are dealing with drawings that are very conceptual and not a whole a lot different than than general take off and is so when cost estimators look at project those details they put a 50% contingency on those costs right off the path bath and so that puts us at 33 million and top of that another 32% for detail design work the project management the construction management the resident engineer and is all of the permits necessary for it and that puts us at free million dollars and i'm hopeful that, that contingen
luxe 125 has been approved. >> item ten a presentation and decide on the port of san francisco blue green way project >>> good answering commissioners david with planning and development and i am to take this opportunity to give the commission and the public an update on a variety of blue green way project and this is a project to complete the water trail from san francisco mission creek on the north to the county line on the south it's a project that has been led by the port but includes many region state and regional agencies currently we have seven project in the act of planning and design and two projects that have been recently completed and so this map illustrate the line of blue green way planning and design guidelines and this is a community planning guidelines to define the los angeles and use and provide community and continue youth between the water front and we initiate tattediated this in 2010 and released a address in 2011 and we are aiming to complete this in january of next rather and one of the reasons that we have not been able to complete this yet is to get a nu
. they are one of my top priorities. even when you look at our prison system for example, just in san francisco county jail alone 75% of inmates didn't graduate from high school. like what can we do to prevent that number from increasing. it's to graduate our kids from high school. this 800,000 is not a lot. it's modest for what we're trying to do. it will help enrichment programs to keep our kids in school. and the other thing i'll say is in regards to our school district, over the last few years, for the first time in over a decade, the school district has actually been reversing the widening achievement gap. and i forget what year it started but since roughly about five years ago the school district has narrowed the the achievement gap every year. and previous to that it had only widened every year meaning the gap between african-american, pacific islander and latino students versus white and asian-american students. now we are finally narrowing that gap so district is on trap, we're doing the work we need to do. this small amount of money will help the school district do the work that it's
general counsel of the san francisco redevelopment agency and now works at shepherdmony and point out an object cures area in the california code and so it was really david's idea that we have been plowing over the last eight years and i want to thank mr. mad way for that brilliant stroke >>> we are the ones who make sense -- david you know the poorliment tree rules better than anyone. come to the mic afterwards so it can be recorded. >> thank you joovment elane knobs port staff and as david said this is putting the law in place and geek getting the mechanism to secure infrastructure financing proceeds and a lot of credit goes to bran son and many of my preed says cor and is monique moyer that has gotten us to this point and right now we are looking to the establish a policy with the board of supervisors that gives us a -- to support this before looking at any particular project. we have present proposed policy to the capital planning committee on november 19th and we will go back for action this month and we are looking to the bring the city policy to the board of interferes in
was there at the building operations, owners, manager's association just yesterday and when we called out for san francisco orange pride week gosh we got a lot of volunteers and that enthese yusm has helped and even larry baer said "i can't believe the number of buildings and the opera hall and the ferry building and the private buildings and coit tower and voluntarily celebrated with us, so that is incredible unity in the city. moving to another topic because we will cover these later i wanted to make sure i mentioned that within these last few months through the cooperation of our city administrator naomi kelly we have appointed a manager of the caps program, and of course that is the community action plan for seismic safety. it is a plan we wanted to make sure that was lead by someone who can immediately get on the ground and figure out all of the things that we need to do to make sure the soft story buildings which are the most important focus that we have to have for the next seismic event and starts with that planning with all of us, so i wanted to make sure to introduce and congratulate patrick ot
Search Results 100 to 118 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)